Events & News at the Walter Schottky Institute

27 Jul 2016

Best Poster Award for "Few-QD nanolaser" at PECS-XII

The contribution "A few-emitter solid-state multi-exciton laser" presented by Michael Kaniber at "The 12th International Symposium on Photonic and Electromagnetic Crystal Structures (PECS-XII)" in York, UK, has been selected out of 40 posters for a runner-up poster award. The research team consists of researchers from Chair E24 at the Walter Schottky Insitut/TU München (S. Lichtmannecker, T. Reichert, M. Blauth, Dr. M. Kaniber, and Prof. J. J. Finley) and from the Solid-state Theory-group at Universität Bremen (Dr. M. Florian, Dr. C. Gies, and Prof. F. Jahnke). We thank the whole team for their efforts and great work! Congratulations!

13 Jul 2016

Best Poster Award at HeFIB for Julian Klein

Julian Klein, Ph.D student at the Walter Schottky Institut, has very recently been awarded with the 1st price for his Poster contribution at the HeFib, "1st International Conference on Helium Ion Microscopy and Emerging Focused Ion Beam Technologies", in Luxembourg (June 8-10). His poster entitled "Optical properties of 2D materials exposed to helium ions" combines novel methods of nanostructuring performed by a helium ion microscope applied to semiconducting atomically thin 2D materials. Julian Klein is supervised by Dr. Michael Kaniber, Dr. Ursula Wurstbauer, Prof. Jonathan Finley and Prof. Alexander Holleitner in the Integrated Quantum Photonics Group at the Walter Schottky Institut. He investigates optical properties of atomically thin 2D materials in combination with plasmonic nanostructures.

04 Jul 2016

CSW 2016 Best Paper Award for Bernhard Loitsch

Bernhard Loitsch, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut won the Best Student Paper Award at the international Compound Semiconductor Week 2016 (CSW2016) held in Toyama (Japan). CSW2016 is a joint venue for the 43rd International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors (ISCS) and the 28th International Conference on Indium Phosphide and Related Materials (IPRM) and a premier forum for science, technology and applications in all areas of compound semiconductors.

He gave an oral presentation entitled “Quantum Confinement Phenomena in Ultrathin GaAs Nanowires”. Based on an evaluation of the quality of abstracts and oral presentations by a panel of international experts, only three papers were selected from a large number of eligible contributions.

Bernhard Loitsch is a student in the Nanowire Group led by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller at the Semiconductor Quantum Nanosystems Chair (Prof. Finley) and investigates growth, structure-property correlations, and advanced optical properties in III-V semiconductor nanowire systems in his Ph.D. thesis work.

Foto: CSW2016

14 Jun 2016

Poster Award at 10th IGSSE Forum in Raitenhaslach

The “Nanowire lasers”-team (IGSSE Project 9.08) working at WSI-TUM (Chair Prof. J. J. Finley) and TUM-EE (Chair Prof. P. Lugli) were recently awarded the Best Poster Award at the 10th IGSSE Forum held in Raitenhaslach (June 1-4). The PhD students Thomas Stettner, Jochen Bissinger, Armin Regler and the Project Team Leader Dr. Michael Kaniber won the 3rd prize with their contribution entitled “Nanowire lasers for information technologies and sensing”. This collaborative IGSSE Project brings together students from the Physics Department/Walter Schottky Institut as well as from the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering and explores the potential of III-V semiconductor nanowires as coherent light sources for applications in future optical on-chip and interconnects communication.

21 Mar 2016

IBM Ph.D. Fellowship for Bernhard Loitsch

Bernhard Loitsch, Ph.D. student at the Walter Schottky Institut, has received the prestigious IBM Ph.D Fellowship award. This is the second successful nomination after an initial award in 2014, which was followed by an ongoing scientific collaboration and mentorship with Dr. Heike Riel, IBM Fellow and Manager of the Nanoscale Electronics group at IBM Research – Zurich. The IBM Ph.D. Fellowship Awards Program is an intensely competitive worldwide program, which honors exceptional Ph.D. students with a $20.000 stipend for one academic year. Bernhard Loitsch is a Ph.D. student supervised by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller and Prof. Jonathan Finley in the Quantum Nanomaterials Group at the Walter Schottky Institut. He investigates the epitaxial growth of GaAs-based nanowire heterostructures as well as their optical and electrical properties.

07 Jan 2016

Arnold Sommerfeld Prize 2015 for Gregor Koblmueller!

Our congratulations to Gregor Koblmueller on being awarded the Arnold Sommerfeld Prize 2015 by the Bavarian Academy of Sciences for his leading work on the realization of Semiconductor nanowire heterostructures and their use for next generation electronic and photonic devices !  Gregor Koblmueller is one of the leading material scientists worldwide and has been active in WSI for many years working on the growth of such nanomaterials and the investigation of their fundamental properties.  More information on the research topics for which he has received his prize can be found on the research pages of the nanowire subgroup of E24.  The prize was presented by the President of the Bavarian Academy, Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Hoffmann as part of the annual general meeting of the academy in December 2015 (see photo).  Join us in congratulating Gregor on this great recognition of the leading work performed by his group, his students and colleagues and wishing all a great start into 2016 ! 

 

c/o BAdW, Foto: A. Heddergott

 

 

 

 

09 Nov 2015

Two Student Awards at Nanowire Growth/Nanowires-2015 Workshop

Two PhD students from WSI-TUM, Martin Hetzl and Julian Treu, were recently awarded with Best Poster Paper Awards at the international Nanowire Growth Workshop (NWG) and Nanowires-2015 Workshop in Barcelona, Spain (October 26-30). Martin Hetzl received a 1st prize Best Poster Award for his contribution entitled “Growth and electrical transport properties of GaN nanowire/diamond heterojunctions". Julian Treu was awarded 2nd prize Best Poster Award for his presentation on “Widely tunable InGaAs nanowire heterostructures and devices”.

Martin Hetzl and Julian Treu are both Ph.D. students supervised by Prof. Martin Stutzmann and Dr. Gregor Koblmüller (Prof. Finley group) and are investigating growth, structure-property correlations, and advanced optical and electrical properties in III-V and nitride-based semiconductor nanowire systems in their Ph.D. thesis work.

18 May 2015

EMRS Graduate Student Award for Julian Treu

Julian Treu, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut and TUM Physics Department was awarded with the EMRS Graduate Student Award at the 32nd  European Materials Research Symposium in Lille, France. The EMRS Meeting is one of the largest conferences in materials science worldwide with over 2000 participants annually.

Based on an evaluation by international experts, his oral presentation entitled “Surface passivation and confinement in lattice-matched InGaAs-InAlAs core-shell nanowires” was selected as the award winning contribution in the Symposium I “Semiconductor Nanostructures towards Electronic & Optoelectronic Device Applications”. Julian Treu is a Ph.D. student supervised by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller in the group of E24 and is investigating III-V semiconductor nanowires for photonic and light harvesting applications. His excellent contribution was recently also published in J. Treu, et al., Nano Letters 15, 3533 (2015). 

27 Mar 2015

Best Paper Student Awards in Nanowire Research

Two PhD students from WSI-TUM, Julian Treu and Benedikt Mayer, were recently awarded with Best Paper Student Awards. Julian Treu received the best student award at the 18th European Molecular Beam Epitaxy Workshop (Euro-MBE) in Canazei, Italy (March 15-18) for his oral presentation entitled “Growth and optical properties of composition-tuned InGaAs-based core-shell nanowire arrays”. In addition, Benedikt Mayer was awarded at the 582. WE Heraeus Seminar on “III-V Nanowire Photonics” in Bad Honnef, Germany (March 22-25) for his presentation on “Monolithically integrated GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowire lasers on Silicon”.

Julian Treu and Benedikt Mayer are both students in the Nanowire Group led by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller at the Semiconductor Quantum Nanosystems Chair (Prof. Finley) and are investigating growth, structure-property correlations, and advanced optical properties in III-V semiconductor nanowire systems in their Ph.D. thesis work.

26 Mar 2015

Optoelectronic quantum transport on a topological surface

Topological insulators are an exceptional group of materials. Their interior acts as an insulator, but the surface conducts electricity extraordinarily well. The group of Alexander Holleitner could measure this now for the first time directly, with extremely high temporal resolution. In addition, they succeeded to influence the direction of the surface currents with a polarized laser beam.

 

Artistic sketch of a polarized laser exciting surface currents in the topological insulator Bi2Se3, which is contacted by two gold electrodes. (c) nature.com and Cristoph Hohmann (NIM).

Original publication: C. Kastl, C. Karnetzky, H. Karl, A.W. Holleitner "Ultrafast helicity control of surface currents in topological insulators with near-unity fidelity" Nature Comm. 6, 6617 (2015).

02 Dec 2014

Graphene layer reads optical information from nanodiamonds electronically

In a recent publication in Nature Nanotechnology, we demonstrate that the spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond can be electronically read-out using a graphene layer on a picosecond time-scale. Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamonds could be used to construct vital components for quantum computers. But hitherto it has been impossible to read optically written information from such systems electronically. The work was led by the group of Alexander Holleitner in collaboration with Frank Koppens (ICFO, Barcelona).

 

Image: Christoph Hohmann / NIM

Link to press release

Original publication: A. Brenneis, L. Gaudreau, M. Seifert, H. Karl, M.S. Brandt, H. Huebl, J.A. Garrido, F.H.L. Koppens, and A.W. Holleitner "Ultrafast electronic read-out of diamond NV centres coupled to graphene" Nature Nanotechnology 10, 135 (2015).

22 Nov 2014

Nanoday at the Deutsches Museum !

„Nano – what does that mean exactly? How is it able to work on that tiny scale? What is the use of the research results?"  You will get answers to these and many other questions at first hand by our scientists.

At the information booths you can do a lot of nano-experiments yourself and in the stage program professors will explain their cutting edge research projects. The program is completed by the comedian Georg Eggers who presents science with a twinkle in his eye.

This year on Saturday 22nd November 10:00-17:00 you will have the chance to experience the world of nanoscience by visiting the NanoDay 2014 at the Deutsches Museum in Munich - Entrance to the exhibit is entirely free !

click here for more information!

 

11 Oct 2014

Tag der offenen Tür am Walter Schottky Institut (WSI) und Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien (ZNN)

Programm des Walter Schottky Instituts: Programm

Das komplette Programm gibt es hier: forschung-garching.de

24 Sep 2014

International Workshop “Nanoscale Assembly and Transport in Biosystems” October 7th, 2014 Venue: International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE)

International Workshop

"Nanoscale Assembly and Transport in Biosystems"

October 7th, 2014

Technische Universität München, Campus Garching

Organizing committee:

M. Tornow and A. Cattani-Scholz

Department of Molecular Electronics,

Walter Schottky Institut (WSI) & Center for

Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (ZNN)

 

Attendance is free of charge. Please register by

October 1st, by sending name and affiliation to

mol@ei.tum.de

 

Program Nanoscale Assembly and Transport in Biosystems

05 Sep 2014

New research group on diamond quantum sensors

A newly established Emmy-Noether research group has joined the WSI on the 1st of September 2014. Its research will focus on quantum sensors based on color centers in diamond and their application in life science, in particular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of single biomolecules. The new group is led by Friedemann Reinhard, formerly a senior scientist in the lab of Prof. Dr. Jörg Wrachtrup at the University of Stuttgart. He has been at the forefront of research on diamond quantum sensors for several years, demonstrating among other results the first detection of NMR signals from a 5nm small sample volume. 

Friedemann and his group will join department E24 (Prof. Jonathan Finley). Funding for the group is provided by the Emmy-Noether program of the Deutsche Forschungsgesellgeschaft (DFG), a support program providing outstanding young scientists with an independent research group.  All of us at the Walter Schottky Institut wish the new group a highly successful start and look forward to fruitful collaborations over the coming years !

17 Jul 2014

The art of photon "bundling"...

In a recent publication in Nature Photonics led by WSI alumnus Fabrice Laussy in collaboration with Jonathan Finley's group, we published a paper in which a quantum optical light source can emit optical energy strictly via "bundles" of curious N-photon quanta, where N can be any integer. Remarkably, what appears to be the simplest possible configuration in cavity quantum electrodynamics - a single-mode optical cavity containing a two-level system like a quantum dot - is capable of exhibiting a broad range of interesting, and even counter-intuitive behaviours when pumped with an external laser.  Fabrice has written an excellent article on the art of photon buldling on his blog.

 

07 Jul 2014

TUM-IAS Rudolf Diesel Industry Fellowship for Dr. Heike Riel (IBM)

The TUM-IAS Rudolf Diesel Fellowship supported by the Institute for Advanced Study is a unique program designed to enhance collaborations between outstanding researchers from industry and TUM target research groups. This year, Dr. Heike Riel (Fellow and Manager of the Nanoscale Electronics division at IBM Research Zürich) has been awarded this prestigious and highly competitive Fellowship based on a joint proposal with Dr. Gregor Koblmüller and Prof. Alexander Holleitner (WSI-ZNN). This 3-year Fellowship aims to develop intensive collaboration on nanowire-based research conducted both at WSI-ZNN and IBM, but also to contribute to the intellectual life at TUM by offering special courses and lectures, workshops and public talks. We send our warmest congratulations to Dr. Heike Riel and look forward to welcoming her at WSI-ZNN and TUM-IAS for upcoming exciting collaborations!

02 Jul 2014

Hocheffiziente nichtlineare Metamaterialien für die Laser-Technik

Trotz aller Fortschritte gibt es noch immer nicht für alle gewünschten Frequenzen geeignete Laser-Systeme. Manche dieser Frequenzen kann man mit Frequenzverdopplern erzeugen, die nichtlineare optische Eigenschaften nutzen. Wissenschaftler der Technischen Universität München (TUM) und der University of Texas (Austin, USA) haben nun einen optischen Baustein entwickelt, dessen nur 400 Nanometer dicke Schicht, 100-mal dünner als ein menschliches Haar, verschiedenste Frequenzen verdoppeln kann und eine Million mal effizienter ist als traditionelle Materialien mit nichtlinearen optischen Eigenschaften.

 

Weiter zur TUM Pressemeldung...

11 Mar 2014

IBM Ph.D. Fellowship for Bernhard Loitsch

Bernhard Loitsch, Ph.D student at the Walter Schottky Institut, has received the prestigious IBM Ph.D Fellowship award. This award is an intensely competitive worldwide program, which recognizes the great potential of individual Ph.D. students in their very early career as well as the quality of the research institution in focus areas of interest to IBM. Dr. Heike Riel, IBM Fellow and Manager of the Nanoscale Electronics group at IBM Research – Zurich, will act as his mentor throughout this fellowship. The award aims to strengthen collaborations between IBM and the core research group of the awardee at WSI-TUM. It covers a $20.000 stipend for one academic year and can be renewed yearly. Bernhard Loitsch is a Ph.D. student supervised by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller and Prof. Jonathan Finley in the Quantum Nanomaterials Group of E24. He investigates the epitaxial growth of GaAs-based nanowire heterostructures as well as their optical and electrical properties.

22 Jan 2014

Official opening of E24 optics laboratories in the Walter Schottky Institut after renovation works!

Recently, it was our great pleasure to welcome Dr. U. Kirste from the Bayerische Staatsministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kunst (Bavarian Science Ministry) during a visit to the group E24 of the Walter Schottky Institut.   It was a great opportunity for Prof. Finley and colleagues to discuss current and future research activities.  Moreover, after many months in which the first group of laboratories were renovated and prepared for new experiments, we could officially declare the optical laboratories "open" and drink a toast to our future successes !  The hard work building up the laser spectroscopy experiments has now begun, students and staff working tirelessly over the Christmas vacations - check back later in spring 2014 to see how we are getting along !    

13 Dec 2013

Keio-TUM Symposium, Dec. 16th - 18th Organizer: M. S. Brandt

From December 16 to 18, four colleagues from Keio University in Japan will be visiting the Schottky Institut to foster ongoing center-to-center collaborations on spintronics and photonics. The half-week of intensive discussions will kick off with a joint seminar on Monday, December 16.

 

 

 

 

15 Nov 2013

Gerhard Abstreiter to be awarded the Stern-Gerlach-Medal of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG)

Gerhard Abstreiter’s research group at the Walter Schottky Institut has long been recognized as as world leaders in the study of the structural, electrical and optical properties of nanostructured semiconductor materials. Over the past 25 years Gerhard's research interests have been diverse ; ranging from the fabrication and study of quantum transport in high mobility semicodnuctor nanosystems to optical phenomena in nanostructures and light scattering spectroscopy to study fundamental excitations in III-V and SiGe semiconductor hetero- and nano-structures. 

In awarding the Stern-Gerlach Medal to Gerhard Abstreiter the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (German Physical Society) has bestowed upon our dear colleague the highest honor in the field of experimental physics - a true recognition for his longstanding contributions to the field of semiconductor nanostructure physics.  The solid gold medal with portraits of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach will be presented to Gerhard in March 2014 at the Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.  All of us at the Walter Schottky Institut would like to say congratulations to Gerhard !

28 Oct 2013

TUM-IAS Focus Workshop on Nanowires Organizers: G. Koblmüller, J. J. Finley and G. Abstreiter

Advances in Semiconductor Nanowire based Photonics

in Munich-Garching, Germany
28-29 October, 2013

http://www.nw-workshop.wsi.tum.de/

22 Oct 2013

"Forschung Live" at the Walter Schottky Institut

It was our great pleasure to welcome almost 1000 visitors to the Walter Schottky Institute and WSI-ZNN during the “Forschung Live” open day held on Saturday 19th October.   This annual event featured more than 80 institutes throughout the research campus of Garching and allowed research groups and companies to throw open their doors and welcome curious members of the public, young and old. 

Members of the Walter Schottky Institute presented their research via talks and hands-on experiments focusing on topics such as “Energy for the future: Photovoltaics”, “High efficiency lighting”, “” exhibit proved to be particularly popular with our younger guests! 

19 Oct 2013

Tag der offenen Tür am WSI und ZNN 11-18 Uhr

19 Sep 2013

Chorafas prize and Feodor-Lynen fellowship for Dr. Kai Müller

Dr. Kai Müller, postdoc in the group of Prof. Jonathan Finley was recently awarded the prestigious Chorafas Prize for his PhD thesis ´´Optical control of quantum states in artificial atoms and molecules``. In his thesis written at the WSI under supervision of Profs. Finley and Abstreiter he developed and applied ultrafast optical methods to explore the quantum properties of charge and spin states in semiconductor artificial atoms and molecules.  The long term goal of this research is to assess their suitability for use as hardware for emergent quantum technologies. The prize involves a diploma and is associated with a financial reward of $5000.

In addition, based on the achievements of his PhD Thesis, Kai was also recently granted a Feodor-Lynen fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt foundation for a two year postdoc project at Stanford University in the group of Prof. Jelena Vuckovic. All of us at the Finley group congratulate Kai and wish him all the best for his promising future!

04 Jun 2013

EMRS Graduate Student Award for Stefanie Morkötter

Stefanie Morkötter, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut and TUM Physics Department was awarded with the EMRS Graduate Student Award at the 30th European Materials Research Symposium in Strasbourg, Palais des Congres, France. The EMRS Meeting is one of the largest conferences in materials science worldwide with over 2000 participants annually.

Based on an evaluation by international experts, her oral presentation entitled “Role of microstructure on optical properties of high-uniformity InGaAs nanowire arrays: Evidence of a wider wurtzite band gap” was selected as the award winning contribution in the Symposium P “Functional nanowires: synthesis, characterization and applications”. Stefanie Morkötter is a Ph.D. student supervised by Dr. Gregor Koblmüller in the group of E24 and is investigating structure-property correlations in III-V semiconductor nanowires in collaboration with the microscopy laboratories at Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (Dr. Markus Döblinger). Her excellent contribution was recently also published in S. Morkötter, et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 205303 (2013).  

27 May 2013

Best student presentation award for Christian Kraeh

Christian Kraeh recently won the award for the Best Student Oral presentation at the EOSMOC-2013 conference (3rd EOS Conference on Manufacturing of Optical Components) in Munich for his presentation entitled: "Micro-Rod Arrays as 2D Photonic Crystal Structures for Light Trapping and Guiding".  Christian Kraeh is an external PhD student at E24 (Prof. Finley's group).  He works in the research laboratories of Siemens AG in Munich on the development of rod-type photonic crystals for mid-IR spectroscopy and gas sensing and performed optical characterisation measurements in the laboratories of the Walter Schottky Institut.

 

 

 

 

01 Apr 2013

Prof. Dr. Jonathan J. Finley new head of chair E24 - Prof. Dr. Gerhard Abstreiter new director of TUM-IAS

With effect from 1st April 2013 Prof. Dr. Jonathan Finley takes over a new role at TUM leading the Chair for Semiconductor Nanostructures and Quantum Systems (E24) at the Walter Schottky Institut, succeeding from Prof. Dr. Gerhard Abstreiter.  The  additional resources available in E24 will allow Prof. Finley and his group to further expand and diversify their teaching and research activities, whilst retaining a strong focus on the physics of nanostructured semiconductors, nano-photonics and solid-state quantum optics.  Prof Finley and the entire Walter Schottky Institut are also very happy that Prof. Abstreiter could be convinced to continue his extraordinary engagement for TUM in his new role as director of the TUM Institute for Advanced Study from 1st of April onwards (more)

07 Jan 2013

Bavarian Academy of Sciences awards Robert-Sauer prize to Dr. Ulrich Rant

The Bavarian Academy of Sciences honors Dr. Ulrich Rant for his “outstanding work in the field of bio-nanotechnology and the development of molecular biosensors” by presenting him with the Robert-Sauer award for excellent research in the natural sciences.

 

Ulrich Rant studied physics at the TU Graz and received his PhD at the Walter Schottky Institute, TUM. He currently heads a group for bio-nanotechnology and molecular sensors at TUM.

 

Link zur Pressemeldung der Physik Fakultät

 

29 Oct 2012

Anouncement: A scientific symposium in memory of Professor Dr. Frederick Koch on November 23.

http://www.ph.tum.de/aktuelles/veranstaltungen/koch

25 Sep 2012

ERC Grant for Prof. Alexander Holleitner (WSI and Physik-Department, TUM)

A Consolidator Grant was awarded by the European Research Council (ERC) in its latest funding round to Professor Alexander Holleitner (Technische Universität München). Alexander Holleitner received the Award for his project ´NanoREAL´ on real-time nanoscale optoelectronics. Consolidator Grants are designed to support cutting-edge research by supporting outstanding researchers who have already shown themselves to be particularly creative. The awards are worth approximately 1.5 million euros over a period of five years. The vision of the ERC proposal ´NanoREAL´ is to investigate the real-time dynamics of photoexcited charge carriers in electrically contacted nanosystems with the highest precision possible. By doing so, unique information about the optoelectronic processes in nanoscale circuits shall be obtained. Towards this vision an optoelectronic ‘on-chip’ detection scheme will be applied to nanoscale circuits, which was developed by the group of Professor Holleitner very recently. In this setup, Professor Holleitner intends to carry out time-of-flight experiments of photoexcited electrons in nanoscale circuits, to investigate the ultimate switching speed of optoelectronic devices, and to explore the ultrafast dynamics of photothermo-electric currents in electrically contacted nanosystems. The project gives essential insights for designing and implementing nanoscale circuits into optoelectronic switches, photodetectors, solar cells, thermo-electric devices as well as high-speed off-chip/on-chip communication modules to make ultrafast nanoscale optoelectronics real.

 

Contact:
***************************************
A.W. Holleitner, Prof. Dr.
Technische Universität München
Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department
Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien
Room 1.005
Am Coulombwall 4a
85748 Garching
T: ++49 89 289 11575
F: ++49 89 289 12600
www.wsi.tum.de

14 Sep 2012

Best Student paper award for Tobias Gruendl

Tobias Gruendl, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut (Prof. Amann, E26), won the Best Student paper Award at the international MIOMD-11 Conference (Mid-Infrared Optoelectronics: Materials and Devices) in Chicago/Evanston (USA). He presented the topic “Type-II Quantum Wells for InP based mid-IR Devices” developed together with Christian Grasse, Stephan Sprengel and Peter Wiecha. In total the conference program consisted of 136 contributions of researchers from 23 countries. 

Prof. Klaus von Klitzing (University of Stuttgart) and
Prof. Manijeh Razeghi (Northwestern University of Evanston)
handing over the award to Tobias Gruendl

03 Sep 2012

First and third place for Stephan Sprengel and Frederic Demmerle at the 'iNOW 2012'

Stephan Sprengel and Frederic Demmerle, both doctoral candidates from Prof. Amann's group at the WSI, received a Best Poster Award at the International Nano-Optoelectronics Workshop (iNOW) in Stanford and Berkeley, USA. Stephan Sprengel's presentation of "Type-II Quantum Wells on InP Emitting up to 3.2 μm" convinced the jury for the 1st place. Frederic Demmerle's presentation of "Extremely Broadband Terahertz Generation by Difference-Frequency Generation with a Cherenkov Phase Matching Scheme" was ranked for the 3rd place.

03 Aug 2012

ICPS Young Scientist Best Paper Award for Kai Müller and Johannes Kierig

Kai Müller, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut and Johannes Kierig visiting PhD student from the University of Regensburg were awarded with the ICPS Young Scientist Best Paper Award at the recent ICPS-31 conference in Zürich, Switzerland. Based on an evaluation of the quality of abstracts and oral presentations by a panel of international experts, only eight papers were selected from a large number of eligible contributions. We are all very proud that two of these prestigious awards went to students from the Walter Schottky Institut, attesting the quality of research conducted here. Kai Müller is a PhD student in the group of Prof. Finley and investigating charge and spin dynamics in vertically stacked self-assembled quantum dot molecules. Johannes Kierig is a PhD student in the group of Prof. Bougeard at the University of Regensburg and investigating double quantum dots in isotopically purified 28Silicon in close collaboration with Prof. Abstreiter.

The presentations were titled ´´Optically probing ultrafast charge and spin dynamics in an individual self-assembled quantum dot molecule`` by Kai Müller, Alex Bechtold, Claudia Ruppert, Johannes Wildmann, Timo Kaldewey, Hubert Krenner, Gerhard Abstreiter, Alex Holleitner, Markus Betz, and Jonathan Finley and ´´Few electron double quantum dot in an isotopically purified 28Si quantum well`` by Johannes Kierig, Andreas Wild, Jürgen Sailer, Joel W. Ager III, Eugene E. Haller, Gerhard Abstreiter, Stefan Ludwig, and Dominique Bougeard.

14 May 2012

Two doctoral candidates from Walter Schottky Institut establish a new company.

Kristijonas Vizbaras and Augustinas Vizbaras, doctoral candidates at

Walter Schottky Institut (Prof. M. -C. Amann, E26) have established a new

start-up company - Brolis Semiconductors ("Brolis" Lithuanian = "Brother"

English).

The company will focus on the molecular beam epitaxial growth of III-V

compounds for mid-infrared optoelectronics, and the development of novel

optoelectronic components, based on GaSb, for the global market. Company's

manufacturing facility and headquarters are being established in Vilnius,

the capital city of Lithuania. Manufacturing facility will include

state-of-the-art high throughput molecular beam epitaxy machine together

with the necessary material and device characterization facilities (HRXRD,

FTIR, Hall, low-T PL, etc.).

 

About Brolis Semiconductors: Brolis Semiconductors was founded by three

Vizbaras brothers - physicists Augustinas and Kristijonas, and an

entrepreneur Dominykas in 2011. The company provides epitaxial growth of

complex III-V semiconductor compounds on GaAs, InP, GaSb, InAs, and InSb

substrates up to 6 inch in diameter. In addition, the company plans to

develop technology for novel mid-infrared optoelectronic components based

on GaSb.

More information: www.brolis-semicon.com  

20 Mar 2012

Researchers at the Walter Schottky Institut demonstrate versatility of solid-state protein sensor

"Identity check" selectively screens single molecules passing through nanopores

A novel type of sensor, based on nanometer-scale pores in a semiconductor membrane, is a step closer to practical use in applications such as analyzing the protein contents of a single cell. Researchers around Ulrich Rant pioneering single-molecule nanopore sensor technology at the Walter Schottky Institut have shown its potential through a succession of experiments over the past few years. Now, in collaboration with biochemists at Goethe University Frankfurt, they have been able to advance this effort past what had been a sticking point: enhancing the selectivity of the sensor while maintaining its sensitivity to single molecules. They report the latest results in Nature Nanotechnology.

 

Further information:

TUM Press Release: German, English (pdf) 

Research Article in Nature Nanotechnology 

 

Article featured in:

Geneteic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Genomeweb - ProteoMonitor, BioFlukes - LabCritics, Frankfurt press release, Deutschlandfunk, Nanowerk, PhysOrg, Nanotechnology Now, Biotechnology Europe, pro-physik, ...

01 Dec 2011

CeNS publication award for L. Prechtel et al.

The publication "Time-resolved picosecond photocurrents in contacted carbon nanotubes" by L. Prechtel, Li Song, S. Manus, D. Schuh, W. Wegscheider, and A.W. Holleitner, Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 269-272, receives a publication award of the Center for NanoScience (CeNS, www.cens.de). The price involves trophy money of 1000.- €.

Download paper at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl1036897

02 Nov 2011

Rohde & Schwarz Award for Jia Chen.

Jia Chen (Prof. Amann group, E26) was awarded the Rohde & Schwarz Award of faculty of electrical engineering and information technology for her dissertation on 'Compact laser-spectroscopic gas sensors using Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers'. The award funded by the company Rohde & Schwarz (link) is given annually since 1989 to the most outstanding dissertation in the field of electrical engineering at the Technical University of Munich and carries the price money of 3000 €.

The dissertation deals with the question how the excellent properties of laser spectroscopy can be made accessible to a broader application range in the field of gas sensing. Theoretical design criteria for optimal laser-optical sensors are determined with a resulting concept including novel components like surface-emitting lasers and gas permeable optical fibers. This together with optimum signal processing allows for a significant increase in sensor resolution and measurement rate as well as a reduction of sensor complexity and cost. Based on the knowledge obtained, the first surface-emitting laser based carbon-monoxide sensors for combustion optimization, fire detection and medical breath analysis are realized and their practical applicability is demonstrated. The dissertation can be found online by this link.

Contact: Jia Chen, now at Harvard University: http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jiachen

24 Oct 2011

Prof. Jonathan Finley receives Prize for Good Teaching 2010 from the Bavarian Ministry for Science, Research and Arts.

On the 17th October 2011, Bavarian state science minister, Dr. Wolfgang Heubisch, led a ceremony at the University of Augsburg to honor top-quality teaching at Bavarian Universities. 

Prof. J. J. Finley was honored to have been selected to receive the Prize for Good teaching of Bavarian universities for 2010.  The prize was established 13 years ago and since then has been awarded to a total of 198 teachers and 4 course coordinators.  Minister Dr. Heubisch saluted the motivation and engagement of the prize recipients, “We need university teaching of the very highest quality in order to ensure the scientific and economic future of Bavaria.  It is only when succeed in providing university students with the best possible quality of teaching that they will be in a position to thrive later in their careers.  As a result, the quality of university teaching is a key criterion for the quality of a university in general.  I thank the prize recipients for their extraordinary engagement for the students.”   

Minister Heubisch mit den Preisträgern Prof. Dr. Jonathan Finley und Dr. Eva Lutz von der Technischen Universität München

 

Wissenschaftsminister Wolfgang Heubisch hat am 17. Oktober den Lehrpreis des Bayerischen Staatsministeriums für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kunst auch an zwei Dozenten der TUM verliehen. In der Pressemeldung heißt es:

Für ihre hervorragende Lehre hat Wissenschaftsminister Wolfgang Heubisch heute in Augsburg 16 Dozentinnen und Dozenten mit dem „Preis für gute Lehre an den staatlichen Universitäten in Bayern“ ausgezeichnet. Der mit 5.000 Euro dotierte Preis wurde vor 13 Jahren ins Leben gerufen und seitdem an 198 Lehrende und vier Arbeitsgruppen vergeben. Wissenschaftsminister Heubisch würdigt das Engagement der Preisträgerinnen und Preisträger: „Wir brauchen Spitzenqualität in der Lehre, um die wissenschaftliche und wirtschaftliche Zukunft Bayerns zu sichern. Nur wenn es uns gelingt, junge Leute hervorragend auszubilden, werden sie später auch Herausragendes leisten. Deswegen ist die Qualität der Lehre ein entscheidendes Kriterium für die Qualität einer Hochschule insgesamt. Ich danke den Preisträgerinnen und Preisträgern für Ihren außerordentlichen Einsatz auf diesem Gebiet.“

23 Oct 2011

Diploma student at the WSI won a Best Poster Award at SemiconNano2011

Alexander Bechtold, diploma student in the group of Prof. Jonathan Finley at the Walter Schottky Institute, won the 2nd Prize of Best Poster Award at "SemiconNano2011" in Austria (11.-16.09.2011) for his contribution "Probing ultrafast intra-molecular dynamics in vertically self-assembled quantum dots".

17 Oct 2011

Best Student paper award for Tobias Gruendl

Tobias Gruendl, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut (Prof. Amann, E26), won the Best Student paper Award (first place) at the IEEE Photonics Societcy Conference 2011 in Arlington, Virginia (USA). His presentation "First 102 nm Ultra Widely Tunable MEMS VCSEL Based on InP" has been  selected as the most outstanding work among 220 contributions. The prize consists of a certificate and carries a value of 1000 $.

26 Aug 2011

Tag der offenen Tür am 15.10.2011, 11-18 Uhr, Garching

Programm des Walter Schottky Instituts: Programm

Programm des Physik Departments: Programm

Weitere Informationen: www.forschung-garching.de

Download Flyer

08 Aug 2011

Walter Schottky Institut receives places 1 – 3 at ‘iNow 2011’

Tobias Gruendl, Sara Yazji  and Christian Grasse, PhD students at the WSI, won the first, second and third place of the Best Poster Award on the 10. International Nano Optoelectronics Workshop (iNow) at St. Petersburg & Würzburg, Russia & Germany (2011).

 

 

01 Aug 2011

The International workshop “Frontiers on Functional interfaces” will take place at the campus of the Technical University of Munich, from September 12th to September 13th

 

The International workshop “Frontiers on Functional interfaces” will take place at the campus of the Technical University of Munich, from September 12th to September 13th. The aim of the workshop is distinctly directed towards exploring all aspects of complex functional interfaces, with a particular emphasis on integrated bio-applications, highlighting the significant potential and future role of advanced materials systems, such as graphene, diamond, and compound semiconductors in this field. The event is jointly financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) of the TUM, and Elitenetzwerk Bayern - Materials Science of Complex Interfaces (CompInt). Please, find more information here.

Abstracts for oral and poster contributions will be accepted until September 2nd(abstract submission to garrido(at)wsi.tum.de)

 

27 Jul 2011

Shamsul Arafin, PhD student at the WSI wins the 2011 IEEE Photonics Society Graduate Student Fellowship

Shamsul Arafin, PhD student at the WSI, have won the 2011 IEEE Photonics Society Graduate Student Fellowship for his research on very long-wavelength GaSb-based BTJ VCSELs as well as his academic record. The Fellowship consists of a one-time award of a $1000.00 honorarium. He will be awarded in IEEE Photonics Society Annual Meeting at the Marriott Crystal Gateway, Arlington, Virginia, USA on Monday 10th October, 2011.

Further information:

http://www.photonicssociety.org/award-winners/Graduate%20Student%20Fellowship

20 Jun 2011

Start-Up Team DYNAMIC BIOSENSORS Awarded BMBF GO-Bio Grant

Start-Up Team DYNAMIC BIOSENSORS Awarded BMBF GO-Bio Grant

2.4M EUR for the development of the switchsense technology, a platform for the chip-based analysis of biomolecular interactions.

Understanding the interactions of biomolecules is essential for biochemical and pharmaceutical research. Some of today’s most powerful drugs are therapeutic antibodies interacting with select cellular structures. On the way to a personalized medicine, researchers in life sciences and physicians require powerful analytical methods to decipher the interplay of a myriad of human proteins in order to diagnose various diseases and to develop targeted and effective treatment strategies.

A team of researchers at the WSI led by Dr. Ulrich Rant has developed a novel technology to analyze molecular interactions with extremely high sensitivity. They have created a biochip system which is based on electrically switchable DNA molecules tethered to microelectrodes. Subjected to alternating voltages, the DNA molecules sway on the electrode surface, ten thousand times per second. With specific receptors (e.g. antigens) attached to their upper ends, they “fish” for corresponding target molecules. Binding of such target molecules (e.g. antibodies) changes the molecular switching behavior of these DNA strands: the altered hydrodynamic properties of the DNA-target complex cause the swaying motion to slow down. Using time-resolved techniques, the dynamics of the electrically driven molecular switching are measured and information about the size, shape, or charge of the target molecule can be obtained.

For the first time, the switchsense method enables researchers to detect and to analyze molecules simultaneously on a chip. “In contrast to conventional biosensors with a passive surface, we actively actuate the biomolecules on the chip. Apart from the determination of binding affinity and kinetics, the unique switching dynamics measurement reveals a wealth of previously inaccessible information. For instance, the size and shape of proteins can be determined – a valuable tool in the world of proteomics, where form defines function”, Dr. Rant states.

 switchsense constitutes a generic platform technology comprising an analytical instrument and a biochip, which can be adapted to target a wide range of biomolecules including proteins and nucleic acids. The fundamentals of the technology have been developed over the past years in the group of Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter at the WSI in collaboration with the Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. (Japan). The project has been supported by the Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft (BMWi, EXIST), the TUM Institute for Advanced Study, and the TUM International Graduate School of Science and Engineering.

In a highly competitive selection process, the dynamic biosensors team was now awarded a GO-Bio research grant of the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF). Only six projects out of 93 proposals could convince the expert jury in this year’s fourth round of the program. GO-Bio supports start-up teams at research institutions and is specifically targeted at life science technologies with high commercial potential. The 2.4M EUR grant will allow nine members of the dynamic biosensors team to develop prototypes and biochips, and demonstrate the applicability of the switchsense method. The TUM Spin-Off plans to launch the technology commercially in 2013.

Further information: www.dynamic-biosensors.com

20 Jan 2011

Bilateral workshop on “Interactions in nanoscale circuits” between Keio University, Tokyo, and the Walter Schottky Institut, TUM, in Garching

A bilateral workshop between the Keio University, Tokyo, and the WSI, TUM, on "Interactions in nanoscale circuits" will take place on the 20th of January, 2011, in the ground-floor seminar room of the "Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien (ZNN)".

 

06 Dec 2010

Prof. Hendrik Dietz mit dem Arnold Sommerfeld-Preis 2010 ausgezeichnet

Auf Beschluss der Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Klasse zeichnet die Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften Herrn Professor Dr. Hendrik Dietz für seine Pionierarbeiten auf dem Gebiet der synthetischen Biophysik bei der so genannten „DNA-Assemblierung“ mit dem Arnold Sommerfeld-Preis aus.

 

Herr Dietz wurde 2007 an der Technischen Universität München promoviert, forschte anschließend zwei Jahre an der Harvard University und ist seit 2009 Professor für Biophysik (W2) an der Technischen Universität München. Er ist ein außergewöhnlich talentierter und kreativer Wissenschaftler. Für seine Diplomarbeit in der Gruppe von Professor Matthias Rief an der Technischen Universität München untersuchte er das grün fluoreszierende Protein (GFP) in aufwendigen mechanischen Einzelmolekülexperimenten auf seine Tauglichkeit als molekularer Kraftsensor. Die Arbeit wurde mit dem BMW Scientific Award ausgezeichnet. In seiner Promotionsarbeit gelang es Herrn Dietz, über Cystein Engineering Proteinketten zu synthetisieren, bei denen eine mechanische Kraft gezielt in jeder beliebigen Raumrichtung angelegt werden kann. Er konnte so zum ersten Mal die mechanische Anisotropie von einzelnen Proteinen untersuchen. Außerdem entwickelte er ein auf einem elastischen Netzwerk basierendes theoretisches Modell, das seine Experimente fast vollständig quantitativ erklären konnte. Die Arbeit wurde mit dem Deutschen Studienpreis der Körber-Stiftung sowie dem Chorafas Preis ausgezeichnet.

2007 ging Herr Dietz zu Professor William Shih an die Harvard University. Innerhalb von nur zwei Jahren war er maßgeblich an der Entwicklung der dreidimensionalen DNA Origami Technik beteiligt, die es zum ersten Mal erlaubte, beliebig geformte dreidimensionale mesoskopische Objekte mit DNA im Reagenzglas zu bauen. Diese Entwicklung ist ein Meilenstein für die DNA-Nanotechnologie und eröffnet ungeahnte zukünftige Anwendungen. Die neue Technik erweiterte Herr Dietz noch entscheidend, nachdem er erkannte, dass gezielt eingebrachte Basenpaarungs-Mismatches eine DNA-Struktur mechanisch verbiegen können. Damit gelang es ihm, beliebig gekrümmte Nanostrukturen zu synthetisieren, die von Zahnradartigen Objekten bis hin zu verdrillten Ketten reichen.

Hendrik Dietz publizierte in erstrangigen Zeitschriften (PNAS, Nature, Science u. a. m.) und erfreut sich in der wissenschaftlichen Welt großer internationaler Aufmerksamkeit. Er ist ohne Zweifel einer der brillantesten Nachwuchswissenschaftler weltweit auf seinem Forschungsgebiet.

 

Quelle: Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften

12 Nov 2010

Shamsul Arafin, PhD student at the WSI wins Best Student Paper Award in the 23rd Annual Meeting of the IEEE Photonics Society

Shamsul Arafin, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut, won the Best Student Paper Award (Second Place) in the 23rd Annual Meeting of the IEEE Photonics Society (formerly LEOS), Denver, CO, USA (2010). His paper titled as, “Large-Area Single-Mode GaSb-based VCSELs using an Inverted Surface Relief” was selected as a finalist among 141 students based on an evaluation of the quality of abstracts and oral presentations by a panel of international experts. Shamsul Arafin is working on GaSb-based Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) in the wavelength range above 2 µm. The prize consists of a certificate and carries a value of 500 $.

Further information: http://photonicssociety.org/newsletters/apr11/Career-BestStudent.html

21 Oct 2010

Program for "International Symposium on Advances in Nanoscience" from 25.-26. October 2010 is now available.

The program for the upcoming "International Symposium on Advances in Nanoscience" is now available here.

04 Oct 2010

Upcoming "International Symposium on Advances in Nanosciene" from 25.-26. October 2010

From October 25th-26th, 2010 the "International Symposium on Advances in Nanoscience" will take place as a joint event of the new research facilities "Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien" and "Institute of Advanced Study" at the Campus Garching. Please find more information here.

04 Oct 2010

Upcoming "SOLID Fall Workshop 2010 - Interfacing solid state QIP systems" from 7.-8. October 2010

The first fall workshop of "SOLID" will take place at the campus of the Technical University of Munich, Germany, from October 7th  to October 8th 2010. The event is jointly organized by SOLID and the Munich Research Centers (Cooperative Research Center 631 and the Cluster of Excellence NIM).  This meeting will bring together about 100 scientists, working on solid state quantum information systems both in theory and experiment. Please find more information here.

22 Sep 2010

Leonhard Prechtel, PhD student at the WSI won a Best Poster Prize at the 457. WE-Heraeus-Seminar

Leonhard Prechtel, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut won a Best Poster Prize at the 457. WE-Heraeus-Seminar on Graphene Electronics - Material, Physics and Devices in Bad Honnef (15. - 18.8.2010) for his contribution "Ultrafast photocurrent response of freely suspended Graphene". Leonhard works in the group of Prof. A.W. Holleitner on time-resolved transport processes in Gallium-Arsenide photoswitches and nanoscale circuits.

13 Sep 2010

Norman Hauke and Arne Laucht, two PhD students at the WSI, are winners of the Carl Zeiss Nano Image Contest 2010

   Winning image in the category CrossBeam

Norman Hauke and Arne Laucht, two PhD students at the WSI, won the Carl Zeiss Nanocontest 2010 in the category "CrossBeam". Out of 130 image contributions 4 winners were elected. Their image shows a silicon photonic crystal nanostructure  into which a rectangular hole has been milled by a  focussed ion beam to prove that the 250nm thick slab membrane is freestanding. The structure was fabricated by Norman Hauke and the image was taken by Arne Laucht with a Zeiss CrossBeam NVision 40 system.  

Such silicon photonic crystals are investigated in the group of Prof. Jonathan Finley, where nanophotonic structures are used to enhance the radiative efficiency of silicon based light sources.

26 Aug 2010

Tobias Gruendl, PhD student at the WSI, won the Best Poster Award on the ninth International Nano-Optoelectronics Workshop, Peking & Changchun, China (2010).

Tobias Gruendl, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut, won the Best Poster Award (First Place) on the ninth International Nano-Optoelectronics Workshop (iNow), Peking & Changchun, China (2010). His poster "High-Speed, High-Power VCSELs based on InP" has been selected as the most outstanding work among more than 150 contributions. Tobias Gruendl is working in the group of Prof. M.-C. Amann on widely tunable, high-power and high-speed Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) in the wavelength range of 1.5 - 2.0 µm. The prize consists of a certificate and carries a value of 500 $.

 

Prof. David Payne (Univ. of Southampton) handing over the award to Tobias Gruendl

 

email: gruendl@wsi.tum.de

20 Aug 2010

2. Platz für "dynamic biosensors" beim Münchener Businessplan Wettbewerb

Wissenschaftler des Walter Schottky Instituts (WSI) der Technischen Universität München (TUM) haben einen neuartigen Bio-Chip entwickelt, der nicht nur für bestimmte Krankheiten charakteristische Eiweiße erkennt, sondern auch sagen kann, ob diese durch den Einfluss der Krankheit oder von Medikamenten verändert wurden. Beim Münchener Businessplan Wettbewerb gewannen sie gestern Abend mit ihrem auf dieser Entwicklung aufgebauten Firmenkonzept dynamic sensors den zweiten Platz.

 

Dr. Jens Niemax, Ralf Strasser, Dr. Kenji Arinaga, Dr. Ulrich Rant (vlnr) haben in Kooperation mit der japanischen Firma Fujitsu am Walter Schottky Institut der Technischen Universität München einen neuen Bio-Chip entwickelt, der Proteine erkennen kann und so die Diagnose von Krankheiten erheblich verbessern könnte. © TU München

Das Immunsystem des menschlichen Körpers erkennt Krankheitserreger an bestimmten Proteinen auf deren Oberfläche. Dieses Erkennungsprinzip lässt sich an vielen Stellen in der Biologie wiederfinden, auch in der Medizin wird es bereits bei Tests genutzt. Nachteil vieler Labortests: Es werden relativ große Probenmengen benötigt, viele Probleme können damit nicht untersucht werden. Bei anderen Tests müssen die zu erkennenden Eiweiße erst mit Reagenzien chemisch verändert werden. Das braucht Zeit und gut ausgebildetes Laborpersonal. Wissenschaftler des Walter Schottky Instituts der TU München haben nun einen Bio-Sensor entwickelt, der für bestimmte Krankheitsbilder charakteristische Proteine hundertmal empfindlicher erkennt als bisherige Tests.

Der Bio-Chip trägt künstlich hergestellte Erbgut-Moleküle (DNA). In wässriger Lösung sind diese Moleküle negativ geladen. In einem elektrischen Wechselfeld schwingen die langen DNA-Moleküle daher ständig hin und her. An der Spitze der Moleküle ist außerdem ein fluoreszierender Farbstoff angebracht, der hell leuchtet, wenn die DNA-Moleküle abgestoßen werden und schwach, wenn sie wieder angezogen werden. Ganz oben auf die Spitze setzten die Wissenschaftler dann Moleküle, die genau zu dem zu erkennenden Protein passen – wie ein Schlüssel zum Schloss. Ist das zu erkennende Eiweiß vorhanden, so bindet es an das Schlüsselmolekül. Weil dadurch der Faden wesentlich schwerer wird, schwingt dieser deutlich langsamer. Da auch Form und Größe des Proteins die Schwingung behindern, kann man aus den Schwingungsmessungen sehr genau ableiten, ob das gesuchte Protein vorhanden ist.

Als einziger kann dieser Bio-Chip nicht nur feststellen, in welcher Konzentration das gesuchte Protein vorhanden ist sondern auch, ob es durch die Krankheit oder den Einfluss eines Medikaments verändert wurde. Zur Zeit setzen die Wissenschaftler einen Chip ein, der 24 verschiedene Eiweiße parallel analysieren kann. „Die Möglichkeit viele Proteine gleichzeitig auf einem Chip bezüglich mehrerer Parameter zu analysieren stellt einen bedeutenden Fortschritt dar“, sagt Dr. Ulrich Rant, wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Lehrstuhl von Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter und Kopf des Projekts. Wichtige Anwendungsbereiche für die von den Wissenschaftlern „switchSENSE“ getaufte Methode finden sich in der medizinischen Diagnostik und der Arzneimittelentwicklung in der Pharmaindustrie. Später könnte es als einfaches und schnelles Analysegerät auch in Arztpraxen stehen und dort Infektionskrankheiten erkennen.

In einer Ausgründung wollen Rant und sein Team nun ihre Entwicklung vermarkten, unterstützt von der TU München und dem Kooperationspartner Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd.. Weitere Unterstützung erhalten sie aus dem Forschungstransferprogramm EXIST des Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Technologie. Bei der Prämierungsfeier des Münchener Businessplan Wettbewerb (MBPW) erreichte ihr Unternehmenskonzept gestern Abend den zweiten Platz. Den ersten Platz belegte die Maschinenwerk Misselhorn GmbH mit einem Konzept zur Verstromung von Abwärme, auf den dritten Platz kam die Sheet Cast Technologies GmbH, die ein Verfahren zur Herstellung leichter Bremsscheiben vermarkten wollen.

In der dritten und letzten Stufe des MBPW 2010, der Excellence Stage, hatten 57 Gründer-Teams ihre kompletten Businesspläne eingereicht. Mit insgesamt 253 Teams und über 2.300 Besuchern des Veranstaltungsprogramms war der MBPW 2010 einer der teilnehmerstärksten Jahrgänge. 37 Prozent der Teilnehmer der Stufe 3 kamen aus Hochschulen und Forschungsreinrichtungen. Bei der Branchenverteilung stellten Information und Kommunikation mit 51 Prozent den größten Teil. Dem Bereich Bereich Chemie/Biologie/Life Science gehören 16 Prozent der Teams an, auch auf den Maschinenbau entfallen 16 Prozent. 11 Prozent der Unternehmenskonzepte sind dem nicht-technischen Bereich zuzuordnen und 7 Prozent dem Bereich Elektronik.

Die Forschungsarbeiten des Team werden unterstützt von Kooperationspartner Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., aus Mitteln des Forschungstransferprogramms EXIST des Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Technologie und der International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE). Ulrich Rant ist ein Carl von Linde Junior Fellow des Institute for Advanced Study der TU München. Eine weitere Doktorandenstelle wird über die International Graduate School of Materials Science of Complex Interfaces (CompInt) finanziert.

 

Weitere Informatonen:

Original-Publikation

Detection and Size Analysis of Proteins with Switchable DNA Layers
Ulrich Rant, Erika Pringsheim, Wolfgang Kaiser, Kenji Arinaga, Jelena Knezevic, Marc Tornow, Shozo Fujita, Naoki Yokoyama, and Gerhard Abstreiter
Nano Letters, 2009 Vol. 9, No. 4 1290-1295 – DOI: 10.1021/nl8026789

Video-Animation der Funktionsweise des switchSENSE-Sensors

http://pr.fujitsu.com/jp/news/2010/04/16-global.html

 

Kontakt

Dr. Ulrich Rant
Technische Universität München
Walter Schottky Institut
Am Coulombwall 3
85748 Garching, Germany
+49.89.289.12778
rant@wsi.tum.de

 

Quelle:

Physik Departement TUM

30 Jul 2010

Arne Laucht, PhD student at the WSI wins IUPAP Young Author Award

Arne Laucht, PhD student at the Walter Schottky Institut, was awarded with the IUPAP Young Author Best Paper Award at the recent ICPS-30 conference in Seoul, Korea. Based on an evaluation of the quality of abstracts and oral presentations by a panel of international experts, only seven papers were selected from a large number of eligible contributions. We are all very proud that one of these prestigious awards went to a student from the Walter Schottky Institut, attesting the quality of research conducted here. Arne Laucht is investigating cavity QED effects in photonic crystal nanocavities in the group of Prof. Finley. The prize consists of a certificate and $500. Congratulations to Arne!

19 Jul 2010

Eröffnung des Zentrums für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien: Neues Zentrum für die Nanowissenschaft

Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien schicken sich an, unseren Alltag zu erobern. Immer mehr nützliche Anwendungen kommen zutage, doch die Erforschung der Nanowelt steht erst am Anfang. Unterstützt von Bund und Freistaat, die sich aufgrund der überregionalen Bedeutung des Zentrums die Kosten teilen, hat die Technische Universität München (TUM) heute den Erweiterungsbau des Walter Schottky Instituts, das Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien (ZNN) eröffnet.

 

 

Das neue Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien ist das erste Gebäude, das nach der Föderalismusreform, den neuen Richtlinien entsprechend, jeweils zu 50 Prozent vom Bund und vom Freistaat Bayern finanziert wird. Insgesamt investieren Bund und Freistaat etwa 14 Millionen Euro in den Bau des neuen Forschungsgebäudes. Die Ausstattung wird aus Drittmitteln, unter anderem aus Geldern der Exzellenzinitiative, ergänzt. Nach einem Jahr Bauzeit ist das Gebäude nun bezugsfertig. Den Wissenschaftlern bietet es auf 2000 Quadratmetern Büros und Laborräume mit modernster Ausstattung.

Die vielfältigen erfolgreichen Aktivitäten des Walter Schottky Instituts (WSI) führten zu einem immer größer werdenden Raumbedarf. Bürocontainer vor dem Haus halfen nur wenig, es fehlte vor allem an zusätzlichen Labors. „Der Erfolg des Exzellenzclusters „Nanosystems Initiative München“ (NIM), an dem wir maßgeblich beteiligt sind, hat den Raumbedarf noch erheblich verstärkt,“ sagt Professor Gerhard Abstreiter, der schon vor 20 Jahren an der Gründung des WSI maßgeblich beteiligt war. „Das neue Gebäude hilft uns, hier ein international herausragendes interdisziplinäres Forschungszentrum zu etablieren.“

 

Aufbauend auf der Erfahrung des auf Halbleiter-Materialtechnologie spezialisierten WSI, stehen im ZNN Nanostrukturierung und Biofunktionalisierung im Vordergrund. Das Forschungsprogramm konzentriert sich damit auf die zwei Schwerpunkte des Exzellenzclusters „Nanosystems Initiative Munich“ (NIM), an dem das WSI entscheidend beteiligt ist, nämlich Nanosysteme für die Informationstechnologie sowie Nanosysteme für die Lebenswissenschaften einschließlich medizinischer Anwendungen.

  

 


In seiner Rede betonte Wissenschaftsminister Wolfgang Heubisch, dass die großartige Entwicklung des Walter Schottky Instituts den Erweiterungsbau notwendig gemacht habe: „Die Verantwortlichen des Walter Schottky Instituts in Garching haben mit ihrem Konzept, Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft zu vernetzen, Maßstäbe in der bayerischen Wissenschaftslandschaft gesetzt. Das Forschungszentrum ist zum Anziehungspunkt für die besten Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt geworden und nimmt deutschlandweit eine Spitzenstellung ein. Das neue Institut wird maßgeblich dazu beitragen, dass der Freistaat Bayern auf dem Zukunftsgebiet der Nanowissenschaften international konkurrenzfähig bleibt.“

 

 

 „Das Walter Schottky Institut ist die Einrichtung der TUM mit der höchsten Dichte an internationalen Postdocs, das Institut mit der größten internationalen Sichtbarkeit,“ sagte Professor Hermann, Präsident der TUM. Der Erweiterungsbau sei ein wichtiger Schritt nach vorne und die gemeinsam mit anderen Einrichtungen nutzbaren Großgeräte eine wichtige Investition in den Standort. Es sei eine Freude zu sehen, wie sich der Freistaat Bayern und der Bund hier tatkräftig engagieren.

Den Bau konzipierte das Münchener Architekturbüro HennArchitekten. Der quaderförmige Baukörper orientiert sich über einen verbindenden Platz zum Walter Schottky Institut und nimmt Raumkanten und Proportionen der umgebenden Gebäude auf. Die Raumaufteilung im Inneren berücksichtigt den hohen Bedarf an Flexibilität und Vernetzung, der die Arbeitsweise der Forscher im Bereich der Nanowissenschaften charakterisiert. Die einzelnen Labormodule verteilen sich auf drei Geschosse und sind durch umlaufende Flure miteinander verbunden. Verglaste Trennwände und offene Räume vermitteln ein hohes Maß an Transparenz.

Kontakt: presse@tum.de

http://portal.mytum.de/pressestelle/meldungen/news_article.2010-07-19.2975979136

 

29 Jun 2010

Eröffnungsfeier - Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien - am 19. Juli 2010, 16:30 Uhr

Am Montag, den 19. Juli 2010 ab 16:30 Uhr wird das Zentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien feierlich eröffnet. Mehr Informationen hier.

14 Jun 2010

Constance Chang-Hasnain joins WSI as Humboldt Research Award winner

Prof. Constance Chang-Hasnain, Humboldt Research Award winner from the University of Berkeley/USA spends June - September 2010 at Walter Schottky Institut and NIM. Connie is an expert in semiconductor lasers and nanophotonics. She will collaborate in this field with experimental groups at WSI and within NIM, area B.

Kontakt:

Markus C. Amann Technische Universität München Walter Schottky Institut Am Coulombwall 3 85748 Garching, Germany Tel.: 089 289 12780 E-Mail: mcamann@wsi.tum.de

22 Apr 2010

Hoch empfindliche Protein-Diagnose: Bio-Chip erkennt Krankheiten

Bei der Bekämpfung von Krankheiten wie Krebs könnte der präzise Nachweis bestimmter Eiweiße einen neuen Weg zur gezielten Bekämpfung weisen. Wissenschaftler des Walter Schottky Instituts (WSI) der Technischen Universität München (TUM) haben zusammen mit dem japanischen Unternehmen Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. einen neuartigen Bio-Chip entwickelt, der nicht nur für bestimmte Krankheiten charakteristische Eiweiße erkennt, sondern auch sagen kann, ob diese durch den Einfluss der Krankheit oder von Medikamenten verändert wurden. 

Das Immunsystem des menschlichen Körpers erkennt Krankheitserreger an bestimmten Proteinen auf deren Oberfläche. Dieses Erkennungsprinzip lässt sich an vielen Stellen in der Biologie wiederfinden, auch in der Medizin wird es bereits bei Tests genutzt. Nachteil vieler Labortests: Es werden relativ große Probenmengen benötigt, viele Probleme können damit nicht untersucht werden. Bei anderen Tests müssen die zu erkennenden Eiweiße erst mit Reagenzien chemisch verändert werden. Das braucht Zeit und gut ausgebildetes Laborpersonal. Nun haben Wissenschaftler des Walter Schottky Instituts der TU München einen Bio-Sensor entwickelt, der für bestimmte Krankheitsbilder charakteristische Proteine hundertmal empfindlicher erkennt als bisherige Tests.  
 
Der Bio-Chip trägt künstlich hergestellte Erbgut-Moleküle (DNA). In wässriger Lösung sind diese Moleküle negativ geladen. In einem elektrischen Wechselfeld schwingen die langen DNA-Moleküle daher ständig hin und her. An der Spitze der Moleküle ist außerdem ein fluoreszierender Farbstoff angebracht, der hell leuchtet, wenn die DNA-Moleküle abgestoßen werden und schwach, wenn sie wieder angezogen werden. Ganz oben auf die Spitze setzten die Wissenschaftler dann Moleküle, die genau zu dem zu erkennenden Protein passen – wie ein Schlüssel zum Schloss. Ist das zu erkennende Eiweiß vorhanden, so bindet es an das Schlüsselmolekül. Weil dadurch der Faden wesentlich schwerer wird, schwingt dieser deutlich langsamer. Da auch Form und Größe des Proteins die Schwingung behindern, kann man aus den Schwingungsmessungen sehr genau ableiten, ob das gesuchte Protein vorhanden ist.  
 
Als einziger kann dieser Bio-Chip nicht nur feststellen, in welcher Konzentration das gesuchte Protein vorhanden ist sondern auch, ob es durch die Krankheit oder den Einfluss eines Medikaments verändert wurde. Zur Zeit setzen die Wissenschaftler einen Chip ein, der 24 verschiedene Eiweiße parallel analysieren kann. „Die Möglichkeit viele Proteine gleichzeitig auf einem Chip bezüglich mehrerer Parameter zu analysieren stellt einen bedeutenden Fortschritt dar“, sagt Dr. Ulrich Rant, wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Lehrstuhl von Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter und Kopf des Projekts. Wichtige Anwendungsbereiche für die von den Wissenschaftlern „switchSENSE“ getaufte Methode finden sich in der medizinischen Diagnostik und der Arzneimittelentwicklung in der Pharmaindustrie. Später könnte es als einfaches und schnelles Analysegerät auch in Arztpraxen stehen und dort Infektionskrankheiten erkennen.  
 
In einer Ausgründung wollen Rant und sein Team nun ihre Entwicklung vermarkten, unterstützt von der TU München und dem Kooperationspartner Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd.. Weitere Unterstützung erhalten sie aus dem Forschungstransferprogramm EXIST des Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Technologie. Auch beim Businessplan Wettbewerb „Science4Life“ und beim Münchener Businessplan Wettbewerb waren sie in der ersten Stufe erfolgreich. Ziel der weiteren Entwicklung ist die Fertigstellung eines seriennahen Prototyps bis Ende dieses Jahres und die Zusammenarbeit mit Pilotkunden aus der Biotech- oder Pharmabranche.
 
Die Forschungsarbeiten werden seitens der TU München unterstützt aus Mitteln der International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE). Ulrich Rant ist ein Carl von Linde Junior Fellow des Institute for Advanced Study der TU München. Eine weitere Doktorandenstelle wird über die International Graduate School of Materials Science of Complex Interfaces (CompInt) finanziert.  

 

Bildmaterial:

 
Dr. Jens Niemax, Ralf Strasser, Dr. Kenji Arinaga, Dr. Ulrich Rant (vlnr) haben in Kooperation mit der japanischen Firma Fujitsu am Walter Schottky Institut der Technischen Universität München einen neuen Bio-Chip entwickelt, der Proteine erkennen kann und so die Diagnose von Krankheiten erheblich verbessern könnte. © TU München
 

Video-Animation der Funktionsweise des switchSENSE-Sensors:

 

Publikation:

Detection and Size Analysis of Proteins with Switchable DNA Layers
Ulrich Rant, Erika Pringsheim, Wolfgang Kaiser, Kenji Arinaga, Jelena Knezevic, Marc Tornow, Shozo Fujita, Naoki Yokoyama, und Gerhard Abstreiter
Nano Letters, 2009 Vol. 9, No. 4 1290-1295 – DOI: 10.1021/nl8026789  
 

Links:

 

weiter Pressemitteilungen:

 

Kontakt:

Dr. Ulrich Rant Technische Universität München Walter Schottky Institut Am Coulombwall 3 85748 Garching, Germany Tel.: 089 289 12778 E-Mail: rant@wsi.tum.de
 

20 Apr 2010

Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften am 15. Mai 2010, 18-24 Uhr

Am Samstag, den 15. Mai 2010 findet am Forschungszentrum Garching wieder eine "Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften" statt. Aus diesem Anlass hat auch das Walter Schottky Institut sein Tore von 18 bis 24 Uhr für ein breites Publikum geöffnet. Mit Kurzvorträgen, Demonstrationsexperimenten und Laborführungen wird über aktuelle Forschungsthemen informiert.

23 Nov 2009

Zwei E.ON Future Awards 2009 gehen an das Walter Schottky Institut

Werner Hofmann (Lehrstuhl Prof. Amann) und Sabrina Niesar (Lehrstuhl Prof. Stutzmann) wurden für ihre herausragenden Abschlussarbeiten mit dem mit 10.000 Euro (Doktorarbeit) bzw. 5.000 Euro (Diplomarbeit) dotierten „E.ON Future Award 2009“ ausgezeichnet.

Die Dissertation „InP-based Long-Wavelength VCSELs and VCSEL Arrays for High-Speed Optical Communication“  von Herrn Werner Hofmann befasst sich mit der Entwicklung eines neuartigen Laser-Chips im Wellenlängenbereich um 1,55 µm, der sehr energie- und kosteneffizient große Mengen an digitalen Daten in Rekordgeschwindigkeit übermitteln kann. Dies stellt damit eine Antwort auf die zentrale Frage nach immer mehr Bandbreite zu immer geringeren Kosten bei stark verbesserter Energieeffizienz dar.

In der Diplomarbeit „Hybride Solarzellen mit Silizium-Nanopartikeln“ von Frau Sabrina Niesar wurden hybride Solarzellen aus Silizium-Nanopartikeln und einem organischen Halbleiter untersucht, die als vielversprechende Möglichkeit gelten, die Sonnenenergie kostengünstiger zu nutzen. Es konnte dabei eine der ersten Solarzellen dieser Art entwickelt werden, bei der gezeigt werden konnte, dass beide Materialien über einen breiten spektralen Bereich der Sonne zur Stromerzeugung beitragen.

E.ON Energie prämiert in Kooperation mit der TU München junge Nachwuchswissenschaftler, die sich in ihrer Abschlussarbeit auf besondere Weise mit einem Thema aus den Bereichen Innovation, Zukunft, Technik und Energie auseinandergesetzt haben. Der „E.ON Future Award“ gilt als der derzeit am höchsten dotierte Wissenschaftspreis, der von deutschen Unternehmen zur Förderung von Forschung und Innovation an Wissenschaftstalente vergeben wird.

10 Nov 2009

NanoDay 2009 - Tag der Wissenschaften mit Jean Pütz und Willi Weitzel

Willi Weitzel (oberes Foto), Moderator von "Willi wills wissen", der beliebten Wissenschafts-Fernsehsendung für Kinder, wird vor Ort sein, wenn NIM (Nanosystems Initiative Munich) zum zweiten NanoDay ins Deutsche Museum einlädt. Mit dabei sein wird auch Jean Pütz (unteres Foto), der vielen durch die Hobbythek und als Schöpfer der Wissenschaftsshow ein Begriff sein dürfte. Er präsentiert beim NanoDay 2009 seine Pützmunter-Wissenschafts-Show.
Außer den beiden Highlights auf der Showbühne hat NIM beim NanoDay jede Menge "Wissenschaft zum Anfassen“ parat. NIM-Wissenschaftler zeigen und erklären ihre Forschung vor Ort an Infoständen und in Vorträgen. Da erfahren Sie zum Beispiel, wie man mit Himbeersaft Strom erzeugen kann, wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop funktioniert, oder Sie bewegen Nanotröpfchen mit dem Joystick hin und her. Im Besucher-Labor können Sie sogar richtig experimentieren. Ort des Geschehens ist diesmal das Deutsche Museum, das sein nagelneues Zentrum für Neue Technologien und die Luftfahrthalle für den NanoDay zur Verfügung stellt.

Samstag, 21. November 2009, 10:00 - 17:00 Uhr, Deutsches Museum, München, Museumsinsel
Eintritt: Normaler Museums-Eintritt
 
Bühnenprogramm im ZNT (Zentrum für Neue Technologie im Dt. Museum)

09 Nov 2009

Herbstuniversität am Walter Schottky Institut



Über die Agentur „Mädchen machen Technik“ werden jedes Jahr in den Herbstferien natur- und ingenieurwissenschaftliche Projekte für Schülerinnen der Oberstufe Gymnasium angeboten, damit diese die Möglichkeit bekommen, in die Universität und die verschiedenen Forschungsbereiche hineinzuschnuppern. Dies soll das Interesse an den Naturwissenschaften fördern und die Mädchen darin bestärken, in diesem Bereich ein Studium aufzunehmen.

In diesem Jahr wurde erstmalig das Projekt „Die experimentelle Welt der Physik“ in Zusammenarbeit  des Walter Schottky Instituts, der Abteilung Praktikumsbetrieb und des Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Forschungsreaktors angeboten. Einen Nachmittag lang haben die Schülerinnen dabei in Vorträgen über die Arbeitsweise und Forschungsfelder sowie verschiedenste Anwendungen im WSI berichtet bekommen. Praktisch erleben konnten sie dies bei der Führung durch insgesamt sechs Laboratorien. Darunter waren u. a. ein Spektroskopie-Labor und der Reinraum, in dem umfassende Gerätschaften zur Herstellung von Halbleitern aufgebaut sind, die nicht an vielen Orten so vollständig gegeben sind. Weiterhin sah man einige Molekularstrahlepitaxien, in denen Kristalle für verschiedenste Forschungszwecke hergestellt werden. Diese Gerätschaften bilden die Grundlage für anschließende Messungen und Proben, u. a. an Leuchtdioden und in Biolaboratorien.

 

Die Mädchen haben viel Neues gelernt und waren von so vielen interessanten und fachlichen Informationen zur Halbleiterforschung zu Ende angemessen erschöpft. Hiermit bedanken wir uns herzlich bei Prof. Finley für die Organisation sowie bei den zahlreichen freundlichen Mitarbeitern, die uns so kompetent und zuvorkommend ihre Forschungsbereiche vorgestellt haben!

 

Die Herbstuniversität 2009 ist mit insgesamt 187 Teilnehmerinnen auf große Resonanz gestoßen und erfolgreich zu Ende gegangen. Die Frauenförderung genießt an der TUM einen sehr hohen Stellenwert, so dass es auch nächstes Jahr wieder ein umfangreiches Angebot geben wird, um junge interessierte Frauen für Technik, Medizin und Naturwissenschaften zu begeistern.
 
Prof. Finley möchte sich bei Vase Jovanov und Florian Klotz für Ihr Engagement bedanken !!!

 

29 Oct 2009

Gerhard Abstreiter zum Mitglied der Deutschen Akademie der Technikwissenschaften gewählt

Die Mitgliederversammlung der Deutschen Akademie der Technikwissenschaften (acatech) hat Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter auf Vorschlag des Präsidiums als neues Mitglied gewählt. Die acatech ist die erste nationale Wissenschaftsakademie Deutschlands. Sie vertritt die Technikwissenschaften im In- und Ausland und berät Politik und Gesellschaft in technikbezogenen Zukunftsfragen.

05 Oct 2009

Tag der offenen Tür am 24. Oktober 2009, 11-18 Uhr

 
Weitere Informationen:

22 Jun 2009

WSI bekommt Besuch vom "Haus der kleinen Forscher"

Die Initiative „Haus der kleinen Forscher“ bietet Kindern im Alter von 3 bis 10 Jahren aus Kindergärten und Kindertagesstätten die Möglichkeit sich mit alltäglichen Fragen aus Natur und Technik auseinanderzusetzen. Die Grundlage hierfür bieten einfache Experimente aus den Fachbereichen der Physik, Chemie und Technik. In diesem praxisnahen Ansatz soll bei den Kindern bereits möglichst früh das Interesse an den Naturwissenschaften und der Technik geweckt und Begabungen gefördert werden. Damit diese Form der frühkindlichen Förderung weiter ausgebaut und intensiviert werden kann, unterstützt das BMBF den bundesweiten Ausbau dieser Initiative.

Am 22. Juni 2009 durften die „Kleinen Forscher“ von der Kindertagesstätte an der Paulckestrasse (München) sogar zwei Stunden lang echte Forscherluft am Lehrstuhl von Herrn Prof. Amann im Walter Schottky Institut der Technischen Universität München schnuppern. In diesem Rahmen erfreuten sie sich nicht nur über leckere Kuchen und Säfte, sondern auch über beeindruckende Experimente, die Ihnen unter anderem das Phänomen der Reibung und die Anwendung der Mikroskopie näherbrachten. So wurde z.B. in einem der Experimente von Herrn Tobias Gründl gezeigt, dass die einzelnen Seiten zweier ineinander gefalteter Bücher eine ausreichend hohe Reibung untereinander aufweisen, um schwere Gegenstände wie einen mit Wasser gefüllten Eimer hochzuheben.
  

Viele bunte Luftballone und eine abschließende Verköstigung mit Eis stellten für die „Jungen Forscher“ den Abschluss eines gelungenen Ausflugs dar, mit dem Wunsch nach einer Fortsetzung der „Forschung“ am WSI.



Gruppenphoto der "Jungen Forscher" und deren Betreuerinnen von der Kindertagesstätte
an der Paulckestrasse (München) zusammen mit Herrn Prof. Amann und Tobias Gründl
vor dem Walter Schottky Institut (WSI).
 

12 May 2009

WSI erhält zusammen mit Siemens den Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis 2009

Der Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis 2009 zum Thema "Optische Sensorik" geht nach München
Der mit 15.000 EURO dotierte Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis geht in diesem Jahr an eine Kooperation der Halbleitertechnologiegruppe des Walter Schottky Instituts der TU München und der Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Power & Sensor Systems, München.

Mit der weltweit erstmaligen Realisierung einer spektroskopie-tauglichen GaSb-VCSEL Laserdiode im Wellenlängenbereich über 2 µm ist das Tor für eine neue Generation von kompakten und kalibrierfreien Gassensoren aufgestoßen. Im Wellenlängenbereich von 2-3,3 µm (mittleres Infrarot) liegen die Absorptionslinien von technologisch, sicherheitstechnisch und umwelttechnisch relevan-ten Gasen wie Kohlenmonoxid, Kohlendioxid, Fluorwasserstoff, Methan, Schwefelwasserstoff etc. Systeme, die in diesem Wellenlängenbereich arbeiten, haben Bedeutung in der industriellen Prozesskontrolle und -steuerung, in der Umweltanalytik (Treibhausgase), Sicherheitstechnik (Branderkennung) und Medizintechnik (erhöhte NO-Konzentration der Ausatemluft bei Asthma).

Die Forscher A. Bachmann und K. Kashani-Shirazi um Prof. Amann vom Walter Schottky Institut haben zusammen mit den Kollegen Frau Chen, Herrn A. Hangauer und Herrn R. Strozda der Siemens AG haben mit ihrer Arbeit die Grundlage für neue kompakte laserbasierte Gassensoren geschaffen, die ein breites Anwendungsspektrum haben, kalibrierfrei sind, ohne Refenzwelle auskommen und durch inhärente Selbstüberwachung Detektionssicherheit bieten. Dafür erhalten sie den Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis 2009.

Der Forschungspreis
Der mit 15.000 Euro dotierte Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis wird bundesweit alle zwei Jahre für herausragende und anwendungsnahe Forschung in den Optischen Technologien ausgelobt und seit 2002 im Rahmen des Innovationsforums Photonik in der Kaiserpfalz zu Goslar verliehen. Stifter des Preises ist der Goslarer Unternehmer Dr. Jochen Stöbich, für den die Förderung exzellenter Wissenschaft das Fundament unternehmerischer Entwicklung und erfolgreicher Positionierung am Weltmarkt darstellt.

Die siebenköpfige Jury aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft hatte in diesem Jahr aufgrund der sehr unterschiedlichen Bewerbungen von überwiegend hohem wissenschaftlichem Niveau drei Arbeiten für den Forschungspreis nominiert. Am Ende hat sich die Arbeit der "Münchener" aufgrund ihres hohen Innovationscharakters, der großen industriellen Bedeutung und des breiten Anwendungs-spektrums durchgesetzt.

Der Kaiser-Friedrich-Forschungspreis sowie das InnovationsForum Photonik als Rahmen-programm zur Preisverleihung wird vom niedersächsischen Kompetenznetz Optische Technologien PhotonicNet und der TU Clausthal organisiert.

Kontakt Preisträger:
Alexander Bachmann
Walter Schottky Institut der TU München
Am Coulombwall 3
85748 München

Tel.: 089 / 289 12788
Fax: 089 / 3206620
Mail: Bachmann@wsi.tum.de

Weitere Informationen im Internet unter: http://www.kaiser-friedrich-forschungspreis.de/de/index.php?option=com_content&a...

URL dieser Pressemitteilung: http://idw-online.de/pages/de/news314660

29 Apr 2009

Erster Spatenstich für das Forschungszentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien

ZNNAls das Walter Schottky Institut (WSI) vor 20 Jahren gegründet wurde, sahen nur wenige Menschen voraus, welchen enormen Einfluss die Halbleitertechnologie auf unser tägliches Leben haben würde. Auch bei der Nanotechnologie und den Nanomaterialien deutet sich eine ähnliche Entwicklung an. Unterstützt von Bund und Freistaat, die sich aufgrund der überregionalen Bedeutung des Zentrums die Kosten teilen, begann die Technische Universität München (TUM) gestern mit dem Erweiterungsbau für das Walter Schottky Institut, dem Forschungszentrum für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien.
 
Bund und Freistaat investieren etwa 14 Millionen Euro in den Bau des neuen Forschungsgebäudes. Die Ausstattung wird aus Drittmitteln, unter anderem aus Geldern der Exzellenzinitiative, ergänzt. Bereits in einem Jahr soll das Gebäude fertig sein und dann den Nanotechnologieforschern auf 2000 Quadratmetern Büros und Laborräume mit modernster Ausstattung bieten.
 
Räume, die dringend benötigt werden, da die Nachfrage nach der im WSI laufenden Halbleiter- und Nanoforschung nach wie vor hoch ist. „Bisher haben wir uns mit zusätzlichen Bürocontainern vor dem Haus behelfen müssen,“ sagt Professor Gerhard Abstreiter, der schon vor 20 Jahren an der Gründung des WSI maßgeblich beteiligt war. „Mit dem Exzellenzcluster „Nanosystems Initiative München“ (NIM) haben wir unsere Forschungsarbeit weiter verstärken können, aber räumlich sind wir nun absolut an der Grenze. Das neue Gebäude hilft uns, hier ein international herausragendes interdisziplinäres Forschungszentrum zu etablieren.“
 
Den Bau konzipierte das Münchener Architekturbüro HennArchitekten. Der quaderförmige Baukörper, so die Planung, orientiert sich über einen verbindenden Platz zum Walter Schottky Institut und nimmt Raumkanten und Proportionen der umgebenden Gebäude auf. Die Raumaufteilung im Inneren berücksichtigt den hohen Bedarf an Flexibilität und Vernetzung, der die Arbeitsweise der Forscher im Bereich der Nanowissenschaften charakterisiert. Die einzelnen Labormodule verteilen sich auf drei Geschosse und sind durch umlaufende Flure miteinander verbunden. Verglaste Trennwände und offene Räume vermitteln ein hohes Maß an Transparenz. Kommen neue Anforderungen, so lassen sich die flexibel nutzbaren Flächen durch geringfügige Umbaumaßnahmen anpassen. Die durchgängig einheitliche Fassadenstruktur fasst die einzelnen Einheiten gestalterisch zusammen. Das Gebäude schafft eine räumliche Plattform für die wesentlichen Arbeitsschritte der Forschung und versammelt ihre Prozessketten unter einem Dach.
 
Der engen Kooperation von Hochschulleitung, Politik, Wissenschaftlern des Walter Schottky Instituts und auch den planenden und ausführenden Verantwortlichen ist es zu verdanken, dass eine so kurze Zeitspanne zwischen anfänglicher Idee und dem tatsächlichen Baubeginn vergangen ist. Die Ehre des ersten Spatenstiches gebührte dementsprechend den Vertretern dieser Bereiche. Anschließend an den Festakt wurde zu einer traditionellen Brotzeit mit Leberkäse, Bretzn‘ und Bier geladen.
 
 Erster Spatenstich
Christoph Göbel (stellvertretender Landrat), Prof. Gunter Henn (HennArchitekten), Prof. Wolfgang A. Hermann (Präsident der TUM), Hannelore Gabor (Bürgermeisterin der Stadt Garching), Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter (Direktor des WSI), Gero Hoffmann (Staatliches Bauamt München 2, Bereichsleiter TUM) (v.L.)
 
Quellen:

27 Feb 2009

Mikhail Lukin erhält hochdotierte Alexander von Humboldt-Professur

Aus 20 Nominierungen hat die Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung in der ersten Runde 2009 vier Preisträger für die Alexander von Humboldt-Professur ausgewählt. Erfreulicherweise ist, Mikhail Lukin von der Harvard-University in Cambridge unter den Preisträgern. Die Berufung des international herausragenden Physikers an die TUM soll eine tragende Säule beim Aufbau des Quantum-Nano-Science Forschungszentrums in Garching werden. Die Alexander von Humboldt-Professur ist mit bis zu fünf Millionen Euro dotiert und damit weltweit eine der bestdotierten wissenschaftlichen Auszeichnungen.

Mikhail Lukin soll im Rahmen einer Doppelberufung zusammen mit dem Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik für die Physik am Campus Garching gewonnen werden. Die mit fünf Millionen Euro dotierte Humboldt-Professur bringt die TU München im Berufungsverfahren einen entscheidenden Schritt voran.
 
Lukin hat auf dem Gebiet der Quanteninformation sowohl theoretische als auch experimentelle Pionierarbeit geleistet und ist bestens vernetzt mit den weltweit wichtigsten Arbeitsgruppen dieses Bereichs. Die TU München plant gemeinsam mit der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft durch Erweiterung des Walter Schottky Instituts den Aufbau eines interdisziplinären Zentrums für die Erforschung von Quanteneffekten in nanoskaligen Festkörpern mit Anwendungen in der Quanteninformation sowie für empfindliche Sensoren (Quantum-Nano-Science-Center). Lukins Forschungsarbeiten passen perfekt in dieses Konzept. In wenigen Wochen beginnen die Bauarbeiten für ein neues Forschungsgebäude für Nanotechnologie und Nanomaterialien neben dem WSI, das bereits zum Sommersemester 2010 in Betrieb genommen werden wird. Dies ist ein erster wichtiger Meilenstein für den Aufbau des neuen Zentrums. Am Garchinger Forschungscampus gibt es darüber hinaus außer am WSI bereits verschiedene weitere Schwerpunkte zu diesem wichtigen und vielversprechenden Zukunftsthema z.B. in der Physik, der Chemie, am Walther-Meissner-Institut und am MPI für Quantenoptik, sowie durch die Exzellenzcluster "Nanosystems Initiative Munich" und "Munich Center for Advanced Photonics". Die angestrebte Vernetzung mit weiteren Fakultäten wird den Campus Garching zu einem weltweit herausragenden Zentrum rund um Nanotechnologie und Quanten-basierte Informationstechnologie werden lassen. Die Gewinnung von Mikhail Lukin wird ein entscheidender Schritt zur Realisierung dieses interdisziplinären Forschungszentrums sein.
 
Pressemitteilungen:
TUM
Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung

16 Dec 2008

Alexander L. Efros joins WSI as Humboldt Research Award winner

Alexander L. Efros, Humboldt Research Award winner from the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington spends December 2008 and January 2009 at Walter Schottky Institut and NIM. Sasha is an expert in the theoretical understanding of optical properties of quantum dots. He will collaborate in this field with experimental groups at WSI and within NIM, area B.

25 Nov 2008

Hans Fischer Senior IAS Fellowship for Prof. Yasuhiko Arakawa

The Technische Universität München, Institute for Advanced Study has awarded a Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship to Prof. Yasuhiko Arakawa from University of Tokyo in recognition of outstanding research and in anticipation of groundbreaking discoveries. This award fellowship is donated with a total sum of 160.000 € and 2 stipends for PhD students for the coming 3 years. A joint project between the Walter Schottky Institut (Prof. Gerhard Abstreiter and Prof. Jonathan Finley) and Prof. Arakawa will be started in the area of Si based nanophotonics based on this fellowship. This project will be part of the focus area of IAS on “Nanoscience and Nanosystems” and is also linked to the cluster of excellence “Nanosystems Initiative Munich”. Prof. Arakawa will spend several shorter and longer periods of time as visiting professor at Walter Schottky Institut, TUM IAS and NIM during the coming 3 years in order to intensify this collaboration. It is also expected that the two PhD students will perform part of their research at the home institute of Prof. Arakawa at University of Tokyo.

The certificate for this fellowship was handed out to Prof Arakawa by Prof. Patrick Dewilde, director of IAS on November 19th in a small ceremony at Walter Schottky Institut. The photo shows from left Gerhard Abstreiter (WSI), Yasuhiko Arakawa (Univ. Tokyo), Jonathan Finley (WSI), Margaret Jäger (IAS), Patrick Dewilde (IAS).

 

Hans Fischer Senior IAS fellowship for Prof. Arakawa

22 Nov 2008

Humboldt Research Fellow will join WSI

Dr. Thomas Grange has been awarded a Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers and will join the theory group of the WSI on January 1, 2009. Dr. Grange graduated from the prestigous Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris and received his PhD in 2008 with G. Bastard and R. Ferreira. His expertise lies in the area of spintronics, optical properties, decoherence in semiconductor nanosystems. Dr. Grange has collaborated with several outstanding research groups in the US and UK and we will be pleased to welcome him in Munich.

24 Oct 2008

WSI student received DAAD fellowship

Werner Hofmann  has received a research fellowship for two years within the Postdoc-Program of the German Academic Exchange Service DAAD. After leaving the WSI in 2009, he will continue his research on high-speed, long-wavelength VCSELs at the University of California, Berkeley, USA

10 Oct 2008

Tag der offenen Tuer am Samstag, 18. Oktober 2008 (11-18 Uhr)

Weitere Infomationen zum Tag der offenen Tür:

24 Sep 2008

Prof Jonathan Finley is awarded the Young Scientist Prize of the International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors.

Prof. Finley was honoured to have recently been awarded the Young Scientist Award at the 35th International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors, held near Freiburg in Germany 21st - 24th September.  One award is presented annually to recongize technical achievements of a scientist under 40 years of age in the field of compound semiconductors (see http://www.iscs2008.com/awards.htm).  The prize was awarded for work on spin physics in quantum dot nanostructures and the observation of quantum coupling in artificial molecules.  Prof. Finley would like to thank all of his colleagues in the Walter Schottky Institut and the students in his group for their dedication and hard work over the past few years. 

15 Sep 2008

PhD student from WSI won best paper award on the IEEE 8th International Conference on Nanotechnology

Roland Enzmann, PhD student at the WSI, won the best paper award on the IEEE  8th International Conference on Nanotechnology, Arlington, Texas, USA (2008). The price carries a value of 500$. His paper “Towards an Electro-Optically Driven Single Photon Emitting Device” was selected from over two hundred contributions. Roland Enzmann is working in the group of Prof. Amann on efficient single photon sources emitting at 1.5 µm based on self assembled InAs quantum dots.

09 Sep 2008

Joint TUM-Keio University Workshop on Nanoelectronics


On September 15 and 16, the Schottky Institut will host the Joint TUM-Keio University Workshop on NanoelectronicsKeio is one of the leading Japanese private research universities and has recently signed a collaboration agreement with the TU München. A delegation of 21 professors and PhD students will come to Garching to present their research activities and to initiate further collaborations.

02 Sep 2008

Two PhD students from WSI win IUPAP Young Author award.

Two of our PhD students, Michael Kaniber and Dance Spirkoska, were both awarded IUPAP Young Author Best Paper prizes at the recent ICPS-29 conference in Rio di Janeiro, Brazil (see www.icps2008.org/prizes.html).  Only nine papers were selected for this prize from several hundred eligible contributions and we were all very proud that two of these prestiguous awards went to students from the Walter Schottky Institut.   Michael Kaniber is researching cavity QED effects in photonic crystal nanocavities in the group of Prof. Finley and Dance Spirkoska is working in the group of Dr. Anna Fontcuberta i Morral researching Ga-assisted MBE grown GaAs nanowires at the chair of Prof. Abstreiter.  The prize consists of a certificate and $500.  Congratulations to both Michael and Dance!

17 Jul 2008

WSI celebrates its 20th anniversary.

In July the Walter Schottky Institut of the Technische Universität München will be celebrating its 20th anniversary with a special symposium at the university campus in Garching on Thursday, July 17. The program consists of a scientific symposium to be held from 9:00 to 16:00 in the Physics Department of TUM in Garching, followed by a “Festveranstaltung” (in German), where Klaus von Klitzing will present the “birthday” speech. The event is intended to be at once scientific and social, with the speakers presenting their cutting edge research, and breaks in between where people can chat. In the morning, former members of the institute will talk about their newest results in research and development. After a buffet-type lunch national and international collaborators will present their institute-related work. In the late afternoon representatives from politics and university will participate and contribute short speeches to the “Festveranstaltung”. There is the possibility to visit the laboratories of Walter Schottky Institute before dinner and there will be ample of time in the evening for chatting and may be presenting some anecdotes.

16 Jul 2008

Jia Chen, PhD student at the WSI, won the 2008 IEEE LEOS Graduate Student Fellowships Award

Jia Chen, PhD student at the WSI, won the 2008 IEEE LEOS Graduate Student Fellowships Award for her research on modeling of the dynamic thermal tuning behavior of VCSELs and advanced gas sensing using long-wavelength VCSELs. The price carries a value of 5000$ plus a 2500$ travel support.

10 Jul 2008

NIM Bilateral Workshop on Nanoscale Systems

On Thursday, July 10 the Nanosystems Initiative Munich organises a "Bilateral Workshop on Nanoscale Systems" in cooperation with Global COE in Secure-Live Electronics (University of Tokyo). The workshop will take place in Garching, Munich. More information and the workshop program can be found on the NIM workshop pages.

09 Jul 2008

Dr. Martin Eickhoff now Professor for Experimental Physics at Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

Since April 1st 2008 Dr. Martin Eickhoff, head of the "Sensors and Materials", holds a professorship for Experimental Physics at the I. Physics Institute at the Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen. In his work he will focus on the growth of GaN- and ZnO-based hetero- and nanostructures as well as the interface formation and electronic interaction between wide-bandgap semiconductors and biological systems.

01 Jul 2008

Kleine Punkte als Sensoren: 1,2 Mio. Euro für Sensorforschung am Walter Schottky Institut

Mit einem Zusammentreffen aller Forschungspartner startet heute das von der Europäischen Gemeinschaft mit 1,2 Millionen Euro geförderte Projekt DOTSENSE. Unter Federführung des Walter Schottky Instituts der TU München entwickeln Wissenschaftler im Rahmen dieses Projekts neue chemische Sensoren auf der Basis von so genannten Quantenpunkten, winzigen Pyramiden aus Halbleitermaterialien. Deren besondere optische Eigenschaften sollen erforscht und für die chemische Analyse von Flüssigkeiten nutzbar gemacht werden. Der Industriepartner des Projekts, das Luft- und Raumfahrtunternehmen EADS, möchte mit den aus dem Projekt resultierenden extrem kompakten Sensoren Flüssigkeiten an Bord von Flugzeugen überwachen. ...

07 Nov 2007

Microsoft Case Study - Messaging und Collaboration: Effizienterer Informationsaustausch durch Bündelung der Kommunikationsformen

Die Mitarbeiter des 1988 gegründeten Zentralinstituts für Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik Walter Schottky Institut (WSI) der TU München erforschen die Grundlagen und Anwendungsmöglichkeiten der Halbleiterelektronik. Sie arbeiten weltweit mit renommierten Forschern zusammen und bilden Studenten aus aller Welt aus. Gemeinsam diskutieren sie ihre Untersuchungsergebnisse und stellen Forschungsanträge. Um die Zusammenarbeit unter den Forschern noch zu verbessern, führte das Institut bereits im Rahmen des Rapid Deployment Program Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 ein. Was jetzt noch fehlte, war eine effiziente Kommunikationsplattform, über welche die Institutsmitarbeiter mit ihren internen und externen Kollegen, Partnern und Studenten bequem mit Ton und Bild kommunizieren können.

12 Mar 2007

Prof. Abstreiter zum Mitglied der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften gewählt

Am 16. Februar 2007 wurden neun Wissenschaftler zu Mitgliedern der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften gewählt. Die Zuwahlen in die Akademie erfolgen ausschließlich auf Grund der wissenschaftlichen Verdienste. Satzungsgemäß können nur Persönlichkeiten aufgenommen werden, deren wissenschaftliche Leistungen „sich nicht in der Übermittlung oder Anwendung bereits vorhandener Erkenntnisse erschöpft, sondern eine wesentliche Erweiterung des Wissensbestandes darstellt“.
In die Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Klasse wurde u.a. Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Gerhard Abstreiter, Ordinarius für Festkörperphysik und Geschäftsführer des Walter Schottky Instituts der Technischen Universität München, gewählt.
Aus der Laudatio: "Als ein international führender Wissenschaftler im Bereich der Halbleiterphysik, der Nanowissenschaft, der Bioelektronik und der Heteroepitaxie von Halbleitermaterialien wurde er aufgrund von außergewöhnlichen Leistungen bereits mit zahlreichen Preisen und Ehrungen bedacht, u.a. mit dem Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz-Preis der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (1986)."

11 Jan 2007

Prof. Stutzmann erhält ein Fellowship der American Physical Society.

Aus der Laudatio: For contributions to the microscopic understanding of electronic processes in semiconductors and the development of novel semiconductor devices. Homepage von Prof. Martin Stutzmann
Externer Link: APS Fellowship

unknown

unknown

unknown

unknown

Semiconductor Nanowire based Photonics Workshop

A workshop focusing on Semicodnuctor Nanowire based Photonics will take place at TUM-IAS and WSI-ZNN on 28-29th October 2013 welcoming 15-20 invited speakers drawn from leading groups across Europe, US and Asia-Pacific will present their latest research results

 

For further information click here.  

TUM Technische Universität München TUM Technische Universität München Physik Department Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik TUM Technische Universität München
 

Events & News

27 Jul 2016

Best Poster Award for "Few-QD nanolaser" at PECS-XII   more

13 Jul 2016

Best Poster Award at HeFIB for Julian Klein   more

04 Jul 2016

CSW 2016 Best Paper Award for Bernhard Loitsch   more

14 Jun 2016

Poster Award at 10th IGSSE Forum in Raitenhaslach   more

21 Mar 2016

IBM Ph.D. Fellowship for Bernhard Loitsch   more